Tag Archives: Krist Novoselic

Wasting Light

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When did the Foo Fighters become this classic band? I’m not exactly sure, but they’re as much if not more of a radio presence, both on current and “classic” stations, as hipper bands such as Nirvana. I still think they’re a great singles band who make merely good to very good albums, but this album definitely falls in the “very good” category, and there’s no denying the number of first class individual songs the band has released over the years.

If you’re not a fan, I suggest you check out the excellent Back and Forth documentary that was released in conjunction with the promotion for this album. It documents the recording sessions for the album but also presents a thorough career overview, warts and all, but I know that I gained a further appreciation for the Foo Fighters as a band and the band as individuals after watching it. Anyway, back to this album, which was recorded by old friend Butch Vig (who remember had produced Nirvana’s Nevermind) in Grohl’s garage using analog equipment, as the band wanted to keep it real and capture the raw, unprocessed sound of a band playing live. The strategy worked very well, because the sound is definitely a throwback to their earliest (best) records, and the album is also aided by several guest appearances, including singer-guitarist Bob Mould, bassist Krist Novoselic (ex-Nirvana), singer Fee Waybill (The Tubes), and keyboardist Rami Jaffee (The Wallflowers), plus Pat Smear is back with the band as a permanent member (having already rejoined their touring ranks since 2006).

As per usual, this album will likely be best remembered by its often-played anthemic singles, and “Rope,” “These Days,” and “Walk” are all very good efforts if not among their absolute best. What distinguishes this album from their prior album is how consistently strong it is from top to bottom, as “Bride Burning” is a hard-hitting opener with a lighter catchy chorus, and “Dear Rosemary” is moodier but still rocking, with Mould adding his trademark intensity and memorably weird vocals. Elsewhere, “Arlandria” is a grower track with another big chorus, “Back & Forth” manages to have a raw sound and still be poppy, with yet another easily singable chorus, and “I Should Have Known” is an emotional ballad (mostly) whose last minute-plus (where Novoselic really shines) is among their most intense ever.

Even the lesser songs (typically the less hooky ones such as “Miss The Misery”) usually have some cool parts that make them worth listening to, as this veteran band shows that they’re still capable of surprises after all

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Bleach

Nirvana’s roots lay in the underground scene. Sonic Youth were early mentors, ‘Surfer Rosa’ by The Pixies a big personal favorite of singer/guitarist Kurt Cobain. Krist Novoselic met Kurt Cobain in 1985, Nirvana were formed in 1987 with Chad Channing on drums and they soon signed to Sub Pop records. ‘Bleach’ was produced and engineered by Jack Endino, a guy who was experienced in the underground scene, ending up producing the likes of Tad, Mudhoney and Babes In Toyland. Nirvana’s debut doesn’t deviate radically from the sound the likes of Mudhoney were achieving at the time, although a song like ‘About A Girl’ certainly had a poppier edge than anything many of Nirvana’s contemporaries were producing. ‘About A Girl’ is a wonderful song actually, and a signpost of what was to come later. First we have two loud, distorted pieces of guitar music, growled or semi-shouted vocals. ‘Blew’ is nothing to write home about, ‘Floyd The Barber’ has good dynamics and works well. Following those two songs, ‘About A Girl’ stands out a mile, a lovely melody and vocal performance. ‘School’ has an addictive sounding, dirty guitar riff and a very powerful, screamed vocal performance. ‘Love Buzz’ had actually been a very early Nirvana single, but it doesn’t sound very out of place here, the bass guitar is good and the screamed ‘chorus’ rather entertaining! ‘Paper Cuts’ opens messily, a weary, pissed off Kurt comes in but the song never really goes anywhere and is less interesting than songs before it on the album.

‘Negative Creep’ opens the second side of the album with a fabulous guitar and bass riff, wonderful ‘alternative anthem’ style lyrics, screamed, stupendous vocals. With ‘About A Girl’ and maybe ‘School’ this works as a highlight of the record and really, is what ‘Bleach’ is all about. Another great guitar groove opens ‘Scoff’, ‘Swap Meet’ has more dirty riffing guitars – you get the idea. ‘Swap Meet’ is actually a favourite of mine, but there you go. ‘Mr Moustache’ is a thrashy, messy kind of song, ‘Sifting’ more considered, ‘Big Cheese’ slightly daft, but highly entertaining all the same. ‘Downer’ ends the album with more of the same, more grunge guitars, more screaming. ‘About A Girl’ apart, the album suffers from a lack of variety, suffers from the same sound being used all over the record. Having said that, this album is very easy to listen to if you like this kind of music.


One By One

A lot of people seem to have really missed the Foo Fighters during their three year absence between albums. At least that’s what I think, because the rave reviews that I’m reading for this album don’t seem justified, as more and more I’m starting to think of the Foo Fighters as a great singles band who merely make good (sometimes very good) albums. Truth is, when I hear a Foo Fighters song on the radio chances are good that I’ll turn it up and sing along, but by the ninth or tenth Foo Fighters song in a row I have a hard time staying enthused. This album stands out due to its return to a grungier sound, and by the fact that it is more atmospheric and less poppy than past efforts. There are some notable highlights as well, as “Low” is a dead ringer for Queens of the Stone Agoe (whose last album and tour Grohl had played drums on, Songs For The Deaf), only with Grohl singing. I think Josh Homme taught him a thing or two about playing guitar, too, because Grohl also unleashes cool riffs on “Have It All” and “Times Like These” (which also has the album’s best lyrics and vocals), while “All My Life” has an agreeably hard-hitting chorus and “Halo” is impressively epic.

Actually, there really isn’t a bad song in the bunch, but though I generally enjoy listening to these songs I’ll be damned if I can remember more than bits and pieces of most of them afterwards. “Come Back,” an explosive and evocative epic (7:45) that ends the album with an exclamation point, is an adventurous exception.


There Is Nothing Left To Lose

With new drummer Taylor Hawkins in tow, Foo Fighters returned with the desperately titled There Is Nothing Left To Lose, which was recorded as a three-piece at Grohl’s home studio. Now, I don’t normally quote press releases, but the one I received describing this album sums it up both succinctly and well: “the Foo Fighters remind us that it is okay to play loudly and in tune, that songs can still be about girls, and that not every band needs a goddamned DJ in the mix.

Indeed, Foo Fighters have little in common with much of what you’re hearing on the radio these days (the less said about that the better), as big pop hooks anchor catchy, commercial-sounding songs such as “Breakout” and “Learn To Fly,” the album’s soaring first single. And though Dave Grohl has rocked both melodically (“This Is A Call”) and softly (“Big Me,” “Walking After You”) before, this is easily the least likely Foo Fighters album so far to have the words “alternative” or “grunge” associated with it. Grunge is dead, after all (or so everyone says), and while I for one miss the great early ‘90s likes of Nirvana, Alice in Chains and Soundgarden, Grohl has never been one to live in the past.

That said, this album has a classic rock influence that reaches back further than anything on their first two albums, and Grohl isn’t above borrowing from the past, introducing a Foghat-like riff on “Gimme Stitches” and a Frampton-styled talking fuzz box on “Generator.” Elsewhere, the band turns down the volume on the pleasingly mellow melodies of “Aurora,” “Next Year,” and “Ain’t It The Life,” while harder rocking tracks such as “Stacked Actors,” “Live-In Skin,” and “M.I.A.” likewise contain choruses that are highly melodic. Yet for all the album’s consistent quality it must be said that it could use a jolt of that old punk energy at times. Also, There Is Nothing Left To Lose, which was so named because the album was recorded before the band had a record label in place, offers consistently very good but no truly great songs aside from “Learn To Fly.” Still, this was another welcome installment by a maturing band that refuses to stay in one place, as Dave Grohl and company continue to build their own impressive legacy irrespective of Grohl’s glorious past.


Dave Grohl is God

I love this MAN..and I’m not ashamed to say it.

Dave dedicated his award to Kurt Cobain and gave a shout to the Pixies! A living LEGEND!


Nirvana Flashback

This is the picture of Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic and Butch Vig taken on Oct. 27th, 2010.

Butch Vig, Krist Novoselic and Dave Grohl

In 1991, ‘Nevermind’ was released, Nirvana blew up the scene, and as they say: ‘Rest is history’

After 20 years later, rest of the gang are jamming. It’s been said Kris will have a guest appearance on few songs, and the next Foo Fighters’ album will be a tribute to “Nevermind’ – I’m pumped for 2011!